3 More Mistakes Rookies Make In PowerPoint

October 29, 2013

Several weeks ago, I shared several mistakes rookies make when making presentations in PowerPoint.   I had come up with such a long list that I decided to write another post.   Here are 3 MORE mistakes people make in PowerPoint presentations.  

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1.  Clashing Colors

Have you ever noticed that PowerPoint has beautiful, COORDINATING color schemes?   They are their for a reason.  They have proven themselves to be pleasing to most people's eyes.   Your color schemes (text and background) should somewhat resemble one of these color schemes.   You can certainly change yours up to match your logo or company colors (we certainly did), but let's not stray too far.   If your logo's colors are out in left field somewhere (like hunter orange, black and camo), well, it might be time to revisit a new company image too, but that's best left for another time.  

2. Slide Transitions/Animations

While I mentioned that you shouldn't necessarily share ALL your text at once (causing people to jump ahead and anticipate what you will say next), you also should avoid unnecessary slide transitions and animations.   By all means, have bullet points appear one at a time as you click the mouse.   But each slide should not swoop in from...somewhere, I guess, nor should it fade in like a bad 1970's sci-fi special effect.    And lets avoid sprinkle in text transitions at all costs.  It slows down readability and causes your audience to spend more time looking at your presentation than listening to what you are saying.  

 

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3. Take Home Message

Many times presenters just wrap up with something like, "...and that's my presentation on TOPIC today.  I hope you enjoyed it.  Does everyone have any questions?"   Which is ok, I guess.   But if you are going into the topic and trying to make yourself look like an expert, it would be awesome to leave them with a summary of what you discussed and remind them of your expertise.  While it's no place for a hard sell, it IS good to remind them that you specialize in the topic and that you earn your living by helping with it.   The last thing they hear is that you do what you do and can help them if they need it.   Which is much better than them just remembering that they went to some seminar about that last year.  Right?  

What is the best PowerPoint tip you ever received?

 Jen Steed writes about technology, travel and more.  You can find her writing for various online and print publications.  To talk to Jen or see all of her articles as they are published, you can follow Jen on .